Archive for the ‘Hubs & Parts’ Category

A reader recently wrote in looking for replacement axle cap nuts for his F&S Torpedo hub. If you have any thoughts on how Greg might be able to source the nuts, please leave them in the comments of this post.

I have a F&S Torpedo coaster hub from 1961 (D).

I am looking for a set of axle cap nuts.

The F&S part number for “Cap Nut” FG 9,5 is 0316 067 500 (2 each).

I have tried Jens in Germany and he does not have any.

Any suggestions where I might try?

Thanks,
Greg

Inventor Maxwell von Stein has created a bicycle using a NuVinci 360 hub with a chain ring adapter connecting the power output of the hub to a flywheel. This allows the rider to aid in braking by first shifting so that power is transferred from the bicycle wheel’s motion and transferred to the flywheel. Then when a boost is desired (when trudging uphill perhaps?) shifting in the other direction will transfer the power from the flywheel to the rear wheel. Cool!

Using the NuVinci continuously variable transmission, the rider is able to smoothly transfer energy to and from the flywheel by shifting up or down.

Check out the video here:

http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201108126

Source: http://www.notechmagazine.com/2011/08/flywheel-bicycle.html

About a month ago, Youtube user gearfreezone (assumed to be associated with Fallbrook Technologies, makers of the Nuvinvi hub) posted 9 instructional videos for the NuVinci 360 which is a continuously variable transmission hub. They cover wheel building, sprocket installation, and shifter installation to name a few.

I’ve embedded all of the videos at the Hubstripping page about the NuVinci 360 for quick reference.

Joule Dynamo HubFrequent Hubstripping reader and commenter Steve Weeks put together the following wonderful writeup about how he fixed his Joule dynamo hub. Hopefully it will be useful to other readers as well.

Continue Reading »

Coasties is a shop in California that is all about coaster brake hubs.  And why not? Coasties are the new fixies. They are also involved with an all coaster brake and 700c wheel bike race called the SLO Little 500! If you’re in the St Luis Obispo California area, that would seem to be the thing to check out. If not, maybe you could start a race up in your area!?

I’ll let Johnny from Coasties tell you the rest:

Coasties…Oh you build custom wheels!?! Cool, can you build me a set of fixie wheels!?!?

No, we can’t. Or more accurately, we don’t. We build ONLY Coaster wheels. Yup. Coasties. It happened organically a few years ago after people noticed us riding them laced to 700 road bike wheels and wanted them too.

A few sets to sold turned into a part time business and full time love of internal Coaster hubs. Now we hand build custom Coaster Brake wheels out from our spot in California. Radial lace yer front? No problem.

While it’s still in it’s infancy, we’re also collecting old knowledge of Coaster Brake culture, events and know-how so people have a home of the Coaster Brake on the internet.

If any of you Hubstripping readers have anything to contribute to the archives, please drop us a line at info@Coasti.es

700c drop bar All-Coaster goodness?

slo little 500

Getting Going in the SLO Little 500, an all Coaster Brake and 700c Wheel Race

SLO little 500 was the brainchild of Tim Wilkinson. We met him at the Bike Expo in SF in 09. Tim does this for the Glory above Notoriety and Fun above Safety.

The SLO little 500 races near St luis Obispo in California with 4 person teams who Relay one bike along the dirt racecourse. http://www.slolittle500.com/how-to-pass-bike

The requirements? 700C wheels. Drop Bars. Coaster Rear hub.

Beer intake, while not required, is assumed. Check out some pics of what we’ve done out here on this coast.

Marco first let us know about Sturmey’s new 2 speed kickback hub here. Let’s look into the S2C further, which has been available since later this summer.

Continue Reading »

The guy is in the second year of his job training as a bicycle mechanic. His stripps a 7 speed sachs / sram hub within seconds.

Thanks John for the link!

On a Cycle-show 2009 S&A showed a 2 Speed kickback hub with a coaster brake like the DUOMATIC from Fichtel&Sachs.

Details can be found on MOULTONBUZZ.com ….

and road.cc

Shimano announces a 11 gear hub. The range will be 409% (Alfine 8 gear 307%). The hub runs in a oil bath like the Rohloff Speddhub. This should result a higher efficiency and longer lifetime. The price will be 300,- Euro release data is September 2010.

Check out our official Alfine 11 page for more info.

Finally a big gap for the use of internal geared hubs on road bicycles is closed. The first STI road shifter for the Shimano ALFINE and Nexus hubs is available

VRS-8-Road-Shifter_lg

The company who provides the lever is called Sussex Enterprises. More informations can be found here!

Thanks Detlef for this valuable information!

I received pictures about another DUOMATIC bicycle Project.  Quite often it´s necessary to space the internal gear hubs to fit them perfect in the dropout width of  the frame. Here is a picture of John´s solution:

IMG_0795

“Attached is a photo of a washer/spacer I made for my duomatic R2110. It is made of soft aluminium so the teeth on the right-side cone of the hub will grip into it. The two milled flat surfaces will fit into the frame dropout, so it does not rotate. With this washer I have been able to space the R2110 hub to 120mm (same as a standard track frame) without any issues of the axle spinning. Note that the photo shows the washer in an unfinished state – I still had to drill out the central hole so it fits over the axle.”

Finally a picture of the actual bicycle status

IMG_0805

Thanks John for sharing your NTWD “Non Turing Washer Design” for the DUOMATIC hub.


Using a Nexus or Alfine internal gear hub from Shimano with a drop bar or a road style handle bar was not possible. The problem were the available shifters.  Jtek a engineering company from Hugo, MN has developed a bar-end shifter. The shifter is very light which hopefully has now influence for his lifetime. From the distance it looks like the main parts are made out of aluminium. Also the design locks rigid! The clamping part needs a 24mm bar diameter.

Thanks to Bob for this information!





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